The weather has definately taken a turn and it’s registering as colder than Europe on some forecasts (I seriously doubt it’s that bad, but who knows!).  For that reason, I am very glad to be in the bay today. None of that windy cold wet boat diving for me today, I’m safely sheltered in Naama, and may even venture out without my drysuit today, just because I can. The hot showers in the centre mean that any amount of chill can be removed within seconds of getting into the courtyard and the changing rooms ensure a windproof area to get changed into my clothes.  Not that boat diving is not fantastic at this time of year, in fact the guests are gushing about the amount of fish, and to be fair it’s only the instructors who are getting cold – the guests are more than happy to be wearing a 5mm suit as opposed to their dry suit when diving at home!
So as I go in the water, with a lovely calm sea ahead of me, I’m feeling rather smug.  As I get in the water, there is no shock factor, in fact it feels warm today. With just a couple of guided house reef dives to do, we happily swim around the house reef, me pointing out the odd fish or coral. I start to notice towards the end of the first dive that my arm is feeling a little cool every time I point at something, but I’ll put that down to enthusiasm.

Come the second dive and I’m just kitting up when disaster strikes. The sound no instructor likes to hear as they don their suit ‘rriiiiiip’. And that when I notice the tear in the shoulder of my suit, from seam to seam, essentially leaving me with a sleeveless and back vented suit.  With no time to change (and nothing to change into!), I have to man-up and do the dive, it’s all part of the job. In my time I’ve done dives with one fin (other lent to a guest), a BCD which doesn’t hold air (same reason) and a particularly impressive dive at Shark Reef in a mask with no strap, so how hard can this be?  In fact, it wasn’t hard, just blooming cold!
As I cheerfully attempted small gestures at the fish, I was also trying to remain as still as possible to prevent further water flushing, and you can just imagine the trouble I had every time I had to turn around to check on the guests! I don’t think I’ve ever been so glad to see the shore line as we ascending from the dive.

A quick shower, and the horrors of the day are washed away with the salt, with my guests taking me for lunch for being so brave (bless them), it’s not turning out to be such a bad day. Just be careful when you have a small snigger at your colleagues misfortune on any given day, it has a nasty way of coming back on you!